Welcome to the Grand Lodge of Ohio

The Grand Lodge of Ohio Order Sons of Italy in America,

The Grand Lodge Foundation,

The John Pirelli Lodge #1633 along with the Bocce Classic and Italian Fall Festa present the

2015 Fiat 500L Summer Festival Tour

 

 

1000 Tickets will be sold at $50 each for a chance to drive away with this 2014 Fiat 500L

An early bird drawing of a 50' HDTV will be drawn on July 20th and the Grand Prize along with a runner up prize of another 50" HDTV will be drawn on Sunday September 7, 2014 at the Italian Fall Festa, Bella Villa Hall.

All proceeds benefit the Ohio Grand Lodge Foundation and the Dayton Foundation (John Pirelli Fund) Vehicle will be driven for promotion and advertising.

 

 

Official Rules

1. The period of the conduct of the Raffle will be from start of ticket sales (May1, 2014) thru Grand prize drawing (Sept 7, 2014);

2. The Raffle will benefit the Sons of Italy Ohio Grand Lodge Foundation and The Dayton Foundation  (John Pirelli Fund);

3. 1000 tickets will be available for sale at $50.00 each;

4. Prizes: Grand Prize (2014 Fiat 500L) and Second prize (50" HDTV) to be drawn on 9/7/2014; Early bird drawing (50" HDTV) to be drawn on 7/20/2014;

5. Should ticket sales result in 599 or fewer tickets being sold, in lieu of the advertised Grand Prize, the Grand Prize winner will receive 50% of the net proceeds from ticket sales [net of the cost of the early bird and second prizes (valued at approximately $500 each) and net of raffle expenses], but not less than $1000.00.  The remainder will go to Sons of Italy Grand Lodge of Ohio Foundation.

6. Eligibility: Open to any resident of the USA and Canada aged 18 or older;

7. Grand Prize Winner is responsible for registration, title, license, taxes and any other fees required to take ownership of the Grand Prize.

8. Winners are responsible to pay any applicable taxes on prizes and will be provided a 1099 for 2014 tax purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Has Sprung

 

Italy, “Italian Traditions”

Italian popular culture is rich in traditions rooted in venerable rites and customs, handed down from generation to generation, expressing an oral and material culture that the celebrations keep alive.

Tied to ancestral rites of passage from Winter to Spring, the Carnival of Venice provides an elegant, masterfully constructed stage for the carnival ritual of switching roles, with the poor, under the cover of a mask, having the chance to belittle the rich at least once a year, in what formerly served as a mechanism of social control and is now played out symbolically as a game, amidst the narrow streets and mysterious settings of this most charming of cities.

History and legend combine in the equally venerable Carnival of Ivrea (in the Piedmont Region), where the freeing of the city from the tyrant who oppressed it during the Middle Ages is re-enacted. Especially enthralling and entertaining is the Battle of the Oranges, the highpoint of the celebration, which still symbolises the city’s spirit of self-determination.

Proud tradition is featured at the Palio di Siena (in Tuscany), a horserace in which the city’s different quarters compete under rules that have held since 1644. The first horse to complete three laps of the central square wins, to the immeasurable joy and ovations of its supporters.

Known as the most pagan of Christia rites, the Procession of the Snakes is held every year in the town of Cocullo (Abruzzo) on the first Thursday in May, when the statue of the patron saint, San Domenico, is paraded along the streets of the town, covered with live snakes whose movements are seen as earthly signs of divine messages. When the snakes wind themselves around the Saint’s head, the sign is a good one and met with applause, but if they twist around his body, then dire predictions are heard among the crowd.

Elements of charm, often suspended between the sacred and the profane, can also be found in the solemn Easter processions in Sicily, where the religious event serves as a pretext for a more ancestral need for social intercourse. It is only during a feast, write Leonardo Sciascia, that the Sicilian stops being a solitary man and becomes a member of a circle, a class, a city or town.

Immerses in an endless, touching silence, the re-enactments of the Mysteries of Santa Cristina of Bolsena (Lazio) are dedicated to the young martyr, who was tormented until she die for having chosen to practice Christianity.

A reminiscence of a medieval religious celebration containing no lack of pagan elements, the Candle Fest of Gubbio (Umbria) is an event that draws much participation from local communities, offering them a chance to express their strong sense of belonging. When the three large wooden structures holding the candles, with statues of the Saints Ubaldo, Giorgio and Antonio on top, are carried at a run, for four kilometres, by the Ceraioli – who bring considerable skill, dedication and training to the task – the onlookers take part in the thrill as well.

-

Enna, Italy - April

Members of the confraternities stand in front of the cathedral during the Good Friday Procession. The rites of the Good Friday Procession date back to the Spanish domination (XV-XVII century) when the confraternities, considered arts and crafts corporations were authorized to form religious organizations in order to promote the religious cult. In 1740 there were 34 confraternities while today there are only 15 and only men are admitted. On Good Friday all the confraternities go to the cathedral and start gathering for the solemn procession where over two thousand members somberly proceed in absolute silence to honor the death of Christ.

-

Venice, Italy - February

Gondola Boats with carnival revelers sail on the 'Canal Grande' as part of a boat parade during Carnival. The Carnival traditionally celebrates the passing of winter with parties, balls and costumes in the run-up to the Christian observation of Lent. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Caltanissetta, Italy - April

Two craftsmen great each other as they pick up the esquire of the Captain of the Royal Craft Associations prior to the Procession in Caltanissetta. The main part of the Holy Week celebrations in Caltannissetta starts on Holy Wednesday with the processions of the Royal Crafts Associations. Four hundred people dressed in black, all part of the most ancient craft association of the town, participate in a parade that has taken place since the middle Ages. The Captain of the Royal Craft Association carries the burden of everyone's mourning and sorrow. At the beginning of the processions he wears black silk socks, gloves and a black tie while carrying in his arms a cross covered with a black veil. A funeral march accompanies the craftsmen to the cathedral in order to celebrate the veneration of Christ. The Captain takes off the black socks and gloves and replaces them with white ones and the corporation’s flags are freed from black ribbons.

-

Piana Degli Albanesi, Italy - April

An Arbereshe priest celebrates the Holy Mass on Easter Sunday according to the Greek-Byzantine rite. Piana degli Albanesi with its six thousand Arberereshe residents is the most important of the five Albanian settlements in Sicily. The Arberereshe are those Albanians who immigrated to Sicily during the XV century after the Turkish invasion of Albania. All the residents still keep there traditions, speak Arberes, which soon will be taught in schools and celebrate their religious service with Greek-Byzantine rite. On Holy Easter Sunday after the Mass, girls dressed with their traditional Arbereshe costume walk in procession in the village handing out sacred red eggs.

-

Venice, Italy - February

Costumed participants attend the great historical parade in St. Mark's Square during Carnival. The Carnival traditionally celebrates the passing of winter with parties, balls and costumes in the run-up to the Christian observation of Lent. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Bolsena, Italy - July

Young actors prepare themselves to re-enact the story of St Cristina's martyrdom during the celebration for the Martyr of St. Cristina. Every year, the town of Bolsena dramatically recreates the tragic ending, suffered by the martyr Cristina during the time of the persecution of Christians. Around 100 young actors on ten improvised stages set up around the town re-enacting the story of St. Cristina's martyrdom in both static and silent scenarios. The scenes feature the floating on the stone in the lake, the wheel and rack, the prison, the ovens, the devils, the flagellation, the destruction of the broken idols, the asps, her death by arrows and the deposition in the tomb. The 12-year-old girl lived in the 3rd century AD and converted to Christianity in spite of the fierce opposition from her father, who was the prefect of the town's municipality. She was buried in the catacombs named after her, but soon the mark of her grave was lost. In 1880, during restoration work of the Christian necropolis, the sarcophagus of stone (including the marble urn with her relic) was brought to light.

-

Caltanissetta, Italy - April

Craftsmen’s children waiting for the beginning of the Procession in Caltanissetta. The main part of the Holy Week celebrations in Caltannissetta starts on Holy Wednesday with the processions of the Royal Crafts Associations. Four hundred people dressed in black, all part of the most ancient craft association of the town, participate in a parade that has taken place since the middle Ages. The Captain of the Royal Craft Association carries the burden of everyone's mourning and sorrow. At the beginning of the processions he wears black silk socks, gloves and a black tie while carrying in his arms a cross covered with a black veil. A funeral march accompanies the craftsmen to the cathedral in order to celebrate the veneration of Christ. The Captain takes off the black socks and gloves and replaces them with white ones and the corporation’s flags are freed from black ribbons.

-

Venice, Italy - February

Artists perform for a guest at "The Ridotto" party organized by the Club Culturale Italiano (C.C.I.) at the Hotel Monaco during Carnival. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Siena, Italy - June

Contradaioli sing ritual chants as they follow their horse to Piazza del Campo before the start of one of six races of the Palio. The Palio takes place twice a year on July 2nd and August 16th to celebrate the Madonna of Provenzano and Santa Maria Assunta. The Palio di Siena horse race, which became, over the centuries a distinctive element of the city, consists of four days of celebration. Only ten of the seventeen teams run and each time their participation are decided by a draw. The seven teams which do not run in the Palio of the same day of the year before, are entitled to run, the other three are drawn from the ten which participated.

-

Venice, Italy - February

Two masked guests kiss each others at the "Luna in Maschera" party at the Luna Hotel Baglioni during Carnival Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Venice, Italy - February

A man feeds pigeons in front of St. Mark's Basilica during carnival festivities in Venice. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Siena, Italy - June

An elderly woman looks at two Standard bearers of the Onda and the Giraffe, two of the Palio teams, as they perform the flag waving display to honor their saint. The Palio takes place twice a year on July 2nd and August 16th to celebrate the Madonna of Provenzano and Santa Maria Assunta. The Palio di Siena horse race, which became, over the centuries a distinctive element of the city, consists of four days of celebration. Only ten of the seventeen teams run and each time their participation are decided by a draw. The seven teams which do not run in the Palio of the same day of the year before, are entitled to run, the other three are drawn from the ten which participated.

-

Venice, Italy - February

A street performer during Carnival. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Ivrea, Italy - February

A team of orange throwers celebrates during Carnival. In the 19th century the carnival in Ivrea brought greatness and a representation of freedom for the city.  The traditional orange battle for which Ivrea's Carnival is known has originated in the middle of the 19th century. Today the contest is still enacted in the main squares of the town where teams in carriages, symbolizing the tyrant's guards, battle against the orange thrower teams on foot, the rebellious commoners, and consist of hundreds of throwers. The battle of oranges is the most spectacular event of the festivities representing the fight for freedom, the symbol of the Ivrea Carnival.

-

Venice, Italy - February

Confetti flies over St. Mark's Square during Carnival. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Bolsena, Italy - July

Actors prepare themselves to re-enact the story of St Cristina's martyrdom during the celebration for the Martyr of St. Cristina in the town of Bolsena. Every year, the town of Bolsena dramatically recreates the tragic ending, suffered by the martyr Cristina during the time of the persecution of Christians. Around 100 young actors on ten improvised stages set up around the town re-enacting the story of St. Cristina's martyrdom in both static and silent scenarios. The scenes feature the floating on the stone in the lake, the wheel and rack, the prison, the ovens, the devils, the flagellation, the destruction of the broken idols, the asps, her death by arrows and the deposition in the tomb. The 12-year-old girl lived in the 3rd century AD and converted to Christianity in spite of the fierce opposition from her father, who was the prefect of the town's municipality. She was buried in the catacombs named after her, but soon the mark of her grave was lost. In 1880, during restoration work of the Christian necropolis, the sarcophagus of stone (including the marble urn with her relic) was brought to light.

-

Venice, Italy - February

St. Mark's Square during the opening ceremony of Carnival. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Gubbio, Italy – May

The Captain of the Candles during the Candles Race in Gubbio. Gubbio's Race of the Candles dates back to the 12th century, of which it’s purpose, was to express gratitude to the then bishop of Gubbio Ubaldo by an annual festival. The Candles consist of three huge wooden constructs, octagonal in shape, and fixed to handle. They measure up to 7 meters in height and weigh for tons, each surmounted by the statue of a Saint. St. Ubaldo is the protector of masons, St. Giorgio, the protector of merchants, and St. Anthony, protector of farm workers. The Candles, housed in the Basilica of St. Ubaldo, are taken down into the town on the 1st Sunday of May. On the morning of May 15th drums awake the two Captains, and what are known as Ceraioli are summoned to a draw of the captains. After having received a small bunch of flowers the Ceraioli begin to parade through the city. At midday the Candles are raised and each Captain pours some water from a jug on a particular point of the Candle and then throws the container through the air. The jug falling on the floor breaks into many pieces, and people pick them up as they bring good luck. Then the ceraioli run three times around the main square and parade the candles around the city. In the late afternoon the Candles are blessed and then starts the extraordinary race along via Dante, descending to the Basilica of St.Ubaldo, on the slope of Mount Ingino.

-

Venice, Italy - February

A participant of a boat parade spits fire as boats with people wearing costumes sail on the "Rio Canareggio" during Carnival Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Trapani, Italy - April

Litter-bearers exhausted inside the Church of Purgatorio with one of the floats, which represents the Passion of Christ and the Via Crucis at the end of the procession of the Misteri. The procession starts from the Church of Purgatorio on Good Friday at noon and lasts twenty-four hours, and because of which many litter-bearers begin to sleep while walking or collapse on the floor in exhaustion. The eighteen floats hold statues in baroque style from the XVII century constructed from wood, plaster, and paper mache, representing religious scenes from the life of Christ.

-

Siena, Italy - June

A horse owner kisses his horse while his horses await the draft selection during the Palio. The Palio takes place twice a year on July 2nd and August 16th to celebrate the Madonna of Provenzano and Santa Maria Assunta. The Palio di Siena horse race, which became, over the centuries a distinctive element of the city, consists of four days of celebration. Only ten of the seventeen teams run and each time their participation are decided by a draw. The seven teams which do not run in the Palio of the same day of the year before, are entitled to run, the other three are drawn from the ten which participated.

-

Venice, Italy - February

Italian athlete Federica Pellegrini descends the St. Mark's bell tower during the flight of the angel opening ceremony for Carnival. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

-

Cocullo, Italy - May

Snake charmers take back their snakes from the statue of St. Dominic at the end of the procession in Cocullo. The snake charmers first catch the snakes with a stick and then by the neck. Traditionally the snake's teeth are extracted using the rim of an old hat. During the procession on the first Thursday in May, before the snakes are placed all over the statue of St. Dominic, they will be fed with milk and kept in containers. According to Italian folklore, the snake represents the unknown aspect and unpredictability of the natural environment with man's innate need to dominate over his own habitat. Wolf hunters, snake charmers and healing saints comfort the people of Cocullo and the whole Sagittario valley, convinced that they will not be ruled by evil's blind forces. Snakes and wolves were the emblems of the Marsians and Irpinians. Some areas in Abruzzo, especially in the Sagittario valley, were under the menace of wolves and snakes, which were a threatening menace for the local people. Therefore the community adopted such magical religious rites in order to symbolically protect the whole territory through St. Dominic's "healing power".

-

Bolsena, Italy - July

A woman pays her respects to the grave of St. Cristina, decorated with fresh flowers, during the celebration for the Martyr of St. Cristina in the town of Bolsena. Every year, the town of Bolsena dramatically recreates the tragic ending, suffered by the martyr Cristina during the time of the persecution of Christians. Around 100 young actors on ten improvised stages set up around the town re-enacting the story of St. Cristina's martyrdom in both static and silent scenarios. The scenes feature the floating on the stone in the lake, the wheel and rack, the prison, the ovens, the devils, the flagellation, the destruction of the broken idols, the asps, her death by arrows and the deposition in the tomb. The 12-year-old girl lived in the 3rd century AD and converted to Christianity in spite of the fierce opposition from her father, who was the prefect of the town's municipality. She was buried in the catacombs named after her, but soon the mark of her grave was lost. In 1880, during restoration work of the Christian necropolis, the sarcophagus of stone (including the marble urn with her relic) was brought to light.

-

Siena, Italy – July

Italian Paramilitary Police "Carabinieri" horse patrol ride their horses in Piazza del Campo prior the start of the fifth race of the Palio. The Palio takes place twice a year on July 2nd and August 16th to celebrate the Madonna of Provenzano and Santa Maria Assunta. The Palio di Siena horse race, which became, over the centuries a distinctive element of the city, consists of four days of celebration. Only ten of the seventeen teams run and each time their participation are decided by a draw. The seven teams which do not run in the Palio of the same day of the year before, are entitled to run, the other three are drawn from the ten which participated.

-

Venice, Italy - February

Masked guests attend the "La serva padrona di Pergolesi" party organized by Nicolas and J.Benedicte Arnita at Ca'Zanardi Palace during Carnival. Carnival originates as a passage from winter to spring and traditionally during that time the license was granted to Venetian people to contravene the strict social rules imposed by the Serenissima Republic such as to lapse into games and parties. Hiding their faces behind masks gave the illusion that it was possible to change identity, sex and social class through an ambiguous exchange of roles. During the eighteenth century the Carnival made it’s peak, however because of the fall of the Republic and the Austrian domination it was abolished and only recently made a cultural come-back that attracts hundreds of thousands of people that desire to live the nineteenth century atmosphere once again.

http://www.marcodilauro.com/features/italian-traditions/http://<form name="PrePage" method = "post" action = "https://Simplecheckout.authorize.net/payment/CatalogPayment.aspx"> <input type = "hidden" name = "LinkId" value ="6617ce4f-5742-4c29-b2a5-28b27c083b81" /> <input type = "image" src ="//content.authorize.net/images/buy-now-gold.gif" /> </form>